Seeking a Runner’s High: Why More Businesses Are Organizing Marathons

How much have marathons continued to grow in the past decades? Back in 1976, there were an estimated 25,000 individuals who finished marathons in the U.S. Fast forward four decades; there is an annual average of around 500,000 marathon finishers in the country. The highest number, so far, is 550,600 marathoners, which was set back in 2014.

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Image source: runcolfax.org

Even if managing these events can be time-consuming, costly, and requires much energy, corporations are getting in on the business of organized road racing because of the benefits it yields, such as the following:

Lucrative return on investment

The largest revenue stream during marathons is the participation fee; the New York City Marathon charges a $255 registration fee for the participants. But even with all the cost channels involved, from marketing to operations, there is still a big amount of profits that awaits. This is why companies usually organize races for charitable fundraising.

Long-term partnership with sponsors

Marathons, especially those that are created for charity or philanthropy, attract sponsors who wish to contribute, too, to a good cause. This provides a means for the organizing corporation to establish a rapport with these sponsors which could prove advantageous for both parties in the long run.

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Image source: pinterest.com

Community building

With thousands of runners looking to participate in marathons, half-marathons, or other running events, organizing one can serve as an effective tool for community building and networking opportunities.

Steven Rinder is a business and corporate development executive with experience in different fields. He is also a running enthusiast. Visit this page for more on Steven.