Hydrate Right: How Much Should a Runner Drink?

In the past years, dehydration seemed to be the problem that made many runners weak. Not having enough electrolytes in their system affected their performance in marathons. This opened up opportunities for different sports drinks to find their way into the market and become the solution for those who need their fluids.

Since running became popular, sports and fitness experts have seen a new trend—over-hydration or hyponatremia. A body that is overhydrated and in action can also mean a low level of sodium in the blood. This could cause disorientation, confusion, muscle weakness, nausea, and vomiting. In worse cases, it could lead to seizures or cardiac arrest.

                                                          Image source: Bikejames.com

Experts from the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and International Marathon Medical Directors Association (IMMDA) suggest that runners should only drink when they feel thirsty. People lose fluids at different rates and to avoid getting into extremes, runners should learn what happens to their bodies when it is time to hydrate.

A cup or two of water is safe enough to cover the first hour of a marathon. Sports drinks can also be consumed in small doses. Finishing multiple cups or a whole bottle might even be detrimental to one’s performance. Throughout the process, what’s important is that the body has an adequate amount of fluids to move swiftly.

                                           Image source: thefuntimesguide.com

Steven Rindner is a business and corporate development executive in the fields of in media, technology, real estate services, and healthcare businesses. For more running tips, subscribe to this blog.

A Girl has to Know: The Impact of Running on the Female Body

Running is a good exercise. It gives people stronger bones and lessens the risk of cancer. Studies even show that running reduces stress, thus making people happier. If you are a runner, these facts may be enough for you to continue running. But if you’re a female runner, there’s more to know on how running’s effect on your body than the abovementioned. The facts below are for you.

Running affects your body differently than how it affects a man’s body. First off, you have estrogen, and this is the greatest difference between you and your male counterpart. Estrogen is the hormone that helps not only in metabolism but also in the absorption of calcium into the bones. Women can intensify their workout or running pace when their estrogen level is high, which happens when the Luteinizing Hormone (LH) from the pituitary gland rise as it releases the egg from the follicle preparing for pregnancy.

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Image source: Theepochtimes.com

However, if you can do high-intensity workouts when your estrogen level is high, you must know how running can affect your menstrual cycle and estrogen levels, too. Running may result in irregular or absent menstruation. When this happens, the estrogen level becomes low, thus, causing lower bone density. Stress fracture may occur because of this, but to prevent this, you can take vitamin D and calcium.

Discharge when running is normal, as well as urinary leakage. According to research, the body movement when running causes intra-abdominal pressure, which leads to the uterus being pressed into the bladder and urethra that results in the leak.

Another thing that running does to a female’s body is that it may increase the risk of yeast infections. Sweat and discharge may cause your natural vaginal yeast to multiply, which can result in infections, discomfort, and severe itching. It’s recommended to wear synthetic garment because cotton and fiber cloths tend to moist more.

For pregnant women who are runners or who might be thinking of running, it must be noted that the activity is considered healthy during the first two trimesters. It helps in reducing nausea, heartburn, and leg cramps, as well as reducing risks of preeclampsia, hypertension, and gestational diabetes. However, pregnant women must avoid running if they are experiencing recurring bleeding and other heart and lungs complications.

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Image source: Health.com

Lastly, running affects women’s breasts. Breasts, big or small, endure a huge amount of force when running. The movement affects the breasts’ tissue. Thus, women must wear a bra with excellent support and fit, including molded and padded cups, underwire, and multiple hooks for easy adjustment.

These are just some things that you ought to know about. However, do not make these as excuses for you to stop doing what you love. Go, run!

More running tips and tricks for both male and female can be found on this Steven Rindner blog .