Category Archives: Steven Rindner

Why it’s important for people to help businesses thrive

The common misconception about businesses is that they’re only truly good for the business owner, and they are the only one who truly profits from it. But that’s not entirely true. Businesses, especially thriving ones, are great for everyone in the long run.

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Everything that is bought to help a business flourish, from vehicles and computers to office supplies, tables, and chairs, all contribute to the growing economy. The money put in to purchase all this is called capital investment and part of it is given to the federal government.

Sure, when a business grows, business owners profit from all their hard work. They also get to buy more equipment for their company to help it expand. Again, part of the money used goes to the government as taxes. As a company increases its profit and as it expands, the more it can give to the economy. The more taxes means the government can pay for better infrastructure for its citizens.

As businesses in a community begin to flourish, so does the community itself. Better roads and better government service come from all the taxes that are paid. This is a huge reason why people are not only urged to help businesses thrive, but start businesses of their own.

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                                                                    Image source: smallbiztrends.com

Steven Rinder is a business and corporate development executive with experience in different fields. He is also a running enthusiast. To learn more about Steven Rindner and the stuff he’s passionate about, check out this Google+ page.

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Behind the vision: Nike’s Breaking2 project

On December 2016, sportswear giant Nike launched a moonshot project that was, as the company described it, “designed to unlock human potential.” The simple but audacious goal was to break the two-hour mark in a full marathon.

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It took Nike two years of planning and research before finally forging ahead with its vision to top the current world record for a marathon at 2:02:57 set by Dennis Kimetto of Kenya in Berlin on September 2014. The sportswear giant also brought together a powerhouse team composed of world-class experts across the fields of biomechanics, coaching, design, engineering, materials development, nutrition, and sports psychology and physiology who scrutinized every aspect of the Breaking2 attempt, from weather conditions leading to the day of the race to products used by the runners.

Moreover, central to the success of the Breaking2 project was the team of elite athletes who were perfectly equipped to chase history down the 26.6-mile track: Kenya’ Eliud Kipchoge, Ethiopia’s Lelisa Desisa, and Eritrea’s Zersenay Tadese. Kipchoge, the men’s marathon gold medalist at the 2016 Rio Olympics, ran a personal of 2:03:05 in the 2016 London Marathon. Tadese, also an Olympic medalist and World Half Marathon Champion, is the current holder of the men’s half marathon world record at 58:23. Desisa, meanwhile, also won a number of high-profile races. During his marathon debut at the 2013 Dubai Marathon, he clocked a personal best of 2:04:45.

While Nike’s quest to beat the two-hour marathon came up short — with Kipchoge finishing the race in 2 hours and 25 seconds – it was still a laudable effort by the brand and its team of experts and elite athletes. As Kipchoge explained, his aim at the start of the race was 1:00:59; but as he crossed the finished line and realized he fell short of his goal, he remarked, “the world is only 25 seconds away.”

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For the latest in the world of marathon, follow this Steven Rinder Google+ page.

Happy Feet: Picking The Right Running Socks

When it comes to running gear, the focus, most of the time, is on choosing the right shoes. While this is crucial whether you are new to the sport or a seasoned marathoner, this fixation overlooks socks, which can change the game.

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Image source: seethisgirlrun.com

By selecting the right socks, runners need not worry about blisters, chafing, corns, overheated feet, and unbearable pain. But here now is the dilemma. With advancements in fabric and design technologies, the humble running socks have morphed into hundreds of varieties that may leave any runner dazed, confused, and dashing out the store. So how do you go and pick the right running socks?

While there’s no exact science for selecting a good pair, running enthusiasts offer these basic guidelines:

  1. Study your options. If runners spend time doing research on the best shoes out in the market, the same amount of examination should be dedicated when shopping for socks. And with the plethora of brands and sock types available, you need to be certain about the pair that you need. For example, do you require moderate or maximum cushion? Are you going to use them for long runs or sprints? Are you particular about your socks peeking out from your shoes or would you prefer a no-show? Or are you all about compression wear? These are just some of the questions a runner has to weigh in before purchasing a pair.
  2. Know the materials. See those cotton socks? Best to run away from them. As most runners know, cotton retains moisture. And with moisture, heat, and friction present in your running shoes, you’ll likely end up with painful blisters. The best material for your socks are synthetic fibers such as nylon, polyester, acrylic, and CoolMax since they wick away moisture and keep the feet dry and cool.
  3. Set a budget. Running isn’t necessarily cheap. You have to spend a good deal for your shoes, clothes, gadgets, sunglasses, and yes, even your socks. A pair of running socks typically sell from $1o to $20. Compression socks are more expensive at around $30 a pair. Remember, you might be needing two pairs of more, so it is best to have a budget while shopping around.
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Seeking a Runner’s High: Why More Businesses Are Organizing Marathons

How much have marathons continued to grow in the past decades? Back in 1976, there were an estimated 25,000 individuals who finished marathons in the U.S. Fast forward four decades; there is an annual average of around 500,000 marathon finishers in the country. The highest number, so far, is 550,600 marathoners, which was set back in 2014.

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Image source: runcolfax.org

Even if managing these events can be time-consuming, costly, and requires much energy, corporations are getting in on the business of organized road racing because of the benefits it yields, such as the following:

Lucrative return on investment

The largest revenue stream during marathons is the participation fee; the New York City Marathon charges a $255 registration fee for the participants. But even with all the cost channels involved, from marketing to operations, there is still a big amount of profits that awaits. This is why companies usually organize races for charitable fundraising.

Long-term partnership with sponsors

Marathons, especially those that are created for charity or philanthropy, attract sponsors who wish to contribute, too, to a good cause. This provides a means for the organizing corporation to establish a rapport with these sponsors which could prove advantageous for both parties in the long run.

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Image source: pinterest.com

Community building

With thousands of runners looking to participate in marathons, half-marathons, or other running events, organizing one can serve as an effective tool for community building and networking opportunities.

Steven Rinder is a business and corporate development executive with experience in different fields. He is also a running enthusiast. Visit this page for more on Steven.