Tag Archives: marathon

Behind the vision: Nike’s Breaking2 project

On December 2016, sportswear giant Nike launched a moonshot project that was, as the company described it, “designed to unlock human potential.” The simple but audacious goal was to break the two-hour mark in a full marathon.

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                                                                                Image source: trackie.com

It took Nike two years of planning and research before finally forging ahead with its vision to top the current world record for a marathon at 2:02:57 set by Dennis Kimetto of Kenya in Berlin on September 2014. The sportswear giant also brought together a powerhouse team composed of world-class experts across the fields of biomechanics, coaching, design, engineering, materials development, nutrition, and sports psychology and physiology who scrutinized every aspect of the Breaking2 attempt, from weather conditions leading to the day of the race to products used by the runners.

Moreover, central to the success of the Breaking2 project was the team of elite athletes who were perfectly equipped to chase history down the 26.6-mile track: Kenya’ Eliud Kipchoge, Ethiopia’s Lelisa Desisa, and Eritrea’s Zersenay Tadese. Kipchoge, the men’s marathon gold medalist at the 2016 Rio Olympics, ran a personal of 2:03:05 in the 2016 London Marathon. Tadese, also an Olympic medalist and World Half Marathon Champion, is the current holder of the men’s half marathon world record at 58:23. Desisa, meanwhile, also won a number of high-profile races. During his marathon debut at the 2013 Dubai Marathon, he clocked a personal best of 2:04:45.

While Nike’s quest to beat the two-hour marathon came up short — with Kipchoge finishing the race in 2 hours and 25 seconds – it was still a laudable effort by the brand and its team of experts and elite athletes. As Kipchoge explained, his aim at the start of the race was 1:00:59; but as he crossed the finished line and realized he fell short of his goal, he remarked, “the world is only 25 seconds away.”

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Seeking a Runner’s High: Why More Businesses Are Organizing Marathons

How much have marathons continued to grow in the past decades? Back in 1976, there were an estimated 25,000 individuals who finished marathons in the U.S. Fast forward four decades; there is an annual average of around 500,000 marathon finishers in the country. The highest number, so far, is 550,600 marathoners, which was set back in 2014.

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Even if managing these events can be time-consuming, costly, and requires much energy, corporations are getting in on the business of organized road racing because of the benefits it yields, such as the following:

Lucrative return on investment

The largest revenue stream during marathons is the participation fee; the New York City Marathon charges a $255 registration fee for the participants. But even with all the cost channels involved, from marketing to operations, there is still a big amount of profits that awaits. This is why companies usually organize races for charitable fundraising.

Long-term partnership with sponsors

Marathons, especially those that are created for charity or philanthropy, attract sponsors who wish to contribute, too, to a good cause. This provides a means for the organizing corporation to establish a rapport with these sponsors which could prove advantageous for both parties in the long run.

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Community building

With thousands of runners looking to participate in marathons, half-marathons, or other running events, organizing one can serve as an effective tool for community building and networking opportunities.

Steven Rinder is a business and corporate development executive with experience in different fields. He is also a running enthusiast. Visit this page for more on Steven.

Watch Out For These Common Running Injuries

Even the strongest, fastest runners suffer from running injuries. Injuries usually happen when runners work too hard or without caution. But running injuries can be prevented. Here are some of the most common running injuries and ways how athletes can avoid them.

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Stress fracture

A stress fracture is a crack in the bone that causes discomfort or pain, often affecting the feet or shin. It happens when runners put too much pressure on their steps. For runners to prevent stress fracture, they must take enough time to rest. Continuous bone stress can lead to more injuries.

Achilles tendonitis

Achilles tendonitis is the inflammation of the large tendon (Achilles tendon) that attaches the calf to the back of the heel. Repetitive pain or stress usually cause this injury in the tendon area. Tight calf muscles are also to blame for this kind of injury. Runners can treat the area by doing calf stretches and icing the area.

Hamstring injuries

Hamstring injuries happen when the leg muscles are weak. People who are flexible such as athletes and dancers are at risk of such injury due to their stretched-out muscles. Those who have muscular imbalance are also candidates for hamstring injuries. Some runners have to rest for weeks and even months before participating in long-distance marathons. A deep tissue massage can help runners recover from hamstring injuries.

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Blisters

A lot of runners think that foot blisters are normal after every marathon. Blisters can affect one’s running performance, especially those who are running long distance. Blisters can be prevented by stopping at the first signs of a hot spot. Runners can put a gel bandage or a moleskin band around the area.

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Going the Distance: Surviving Long Runs

Long runs are undoubtedly vital when training for marathons. Runners may have heard of the “marathon wall,” which is a much-feared point (about 20 miles) while running in which the runner’s stored energy in the muscles, substantially slow down his pace. Here are some tips to beat the wall during long runs:

Include long runs into training routine: Aside from short to average-distance runs and cardio training, runners must include long runs in their training routines. Long runs should be achieved once every 10 to 14 days. Running longer per week also increases the body’s capacity to store more glycogen.

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Image source: verywell.com

Treat a long run as the real deal: It would help runners to treat their long runs like the actual marathon day. They must condition the mind and body the day before the long run and even wear the same shoes that they would wear on race day.

Re-fuel the body with calories: The stored glycogen in the muscles gets expended when running for longer than 90 minutes. Refueling the body with snacks and drinks filled with ample supply of calories while running boosts performance and prevents the body from failing.

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Image source: verywell.com

Plan the route: Runners should plot their running path so they have a finish line to think about instead of just running for hours without a specific finishing point.

A passionate leader and marathon enthusiast, <ahref=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ePxK9Aii9tM”>Steven Rindner leads corporate development initiatives at Besins Healthcare and he also joins various marathon events. For updates on his interests and expertise, follow this

Steven Rindner on Preparing for Your First Marathon

Running your first marathon can be an enormously satisfying experience – but when it comes to training you need to start out slowly and do it right! Here are a few tips to prepare yourself for the big day:

1. Especially if you’re not used to long-distance running, you need to visit your doctor before you start training. Marathons have a much higher risk of injury than other types of exercise.

2. Why do you want to run a marathon? The answer to this question will motivate and inspire you as you train, so keep it in the forefront of your mind.

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3. If you’re anxious to jump in and sign up for that race, that’s great. But you should be able to run a consistent base mileage for a year – and that’s just the prequel to a marathon training program. A good goal to shoot for is being able to run 20-30 miles a week regularly before you head into training.

4. Run some short races before jumping into a full marathon. This will help you to see what you’re up against. Even if you just go to a marathon and watch, it will help you get an idea of what running a race entails.

5. Plan your training. Most training plans will range from 12 to 20 weeks, and you’ll spend the time building your endurance. You should start out slowly, running three to five times a week, and increasing your mileage weekly. However, this week-to-week increase should never be more than 10%.

6. Don’t forget to incorporate some rest into your plan, as well! This means a few days of the week where you don’t run at all. This will let your muscles recover from the days you do run, which will help to prevent injury.

To ensure a successful marathon, make sure you plan ahead!

For more tips on running a marathon, check out Steven Rindner‘s website.