The Shared Future Of Technology And Classroom Education

In the 1980s, schools started offering computer classes in the DOS format. The following decade saw the introduction of windows into the curriculum. The 2000s saw the use of tablets in classrooms everywhere.

Image source: gvu.gatech.edu

Now more than ever, the future of classroom education seems irrevocably tied to technology. And that is perceived as an advantage. Technology has had a generally positive impact on the way people go about their everyday lives, not exempting how people study and learn. Technology has paved new worlds both educators and students can explore. But this is just the beginning.

The development of virtual and augmented reality could introduce the possibility of students experiencing simulations of processes and events–-such as atomic reactions or sailing through the eye of a storm—previously thought non-replicable.

Students performing delicate surgical procedures in medical schools will also benefit heavily from technology, as new tools and devices allow for more accurate incisions.

The rise of technology doesn’t necessarily translate to the decline of books and other old-school tools such as projectors and slides, as some traditionalists are anticipating. Libraries remain the main bastions of reliable information. And while a few teachers and professors may be afraid of losing their jobs to robots in the future, their experience could not be replaced by the mechanical capabilities of robots.

Image source: edtechreview.in

Technology, despite its ubiquity and importance, should be viewed only as a tool – probably the best tool for education at the moment.

Steven Rindner is a results-oriented executive with a strong background in business development and growth strategy across a number of industries including technology, real estate services, and healthcare. For more about him and his work, visit this page.

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